Can You Freeze Sour Cream?

Can you freeze sour cream? We all love some sour cream but it does go bad. Can you freeze it to make it last longer and will it stay fresh?

So you’ve just enjoyed some sour cream with your nachos, and you’ve been extra careful not to double-dip or put any dirty utensils in there.

But you know you won’t use up this entire tub within 2 weeks, so you’re wondering:

Can you freeze sour cream? Will freezing spoil sour cream?

You’ve come to the right place. In this article, we’ll break down if you should freeze sour cream, how to freeze sour cream, and other storage methods you should consider.

Here’s the lowdown: Only use thawed sour cream in cooking or baking recipes, as the texture of sour cream changes after thawing. However, in recipes, you won’t notice anything unusual, and freezing will keep your sour cream good for up to 6 months!

Related:Does Sour Cream Go Bad?Does Cream Cheese Go Bad?Does Mayonnaise Go Bad?

How To Freeze Sour Cream

If you haven’t opened your tub of sour cream yet, your job is easy! Simply freeze the whole unopened original package.

If you have already opened your sour cream, it’s not much harder. Just pour the leftovers into an airtight container and freeze.

Remember that your sour cream will freeze solid, so portioning isn’t easy, and you don’t want to end up with a bunch of thawed sour cream you won’t use and can’t re-freeze.

Therefore, consider portioning out sour cream into cupcake trays. Then, cover the trays in plastic wrap or silver foil and transfer them to the freezer for 2 hours.

Now this “flash freeze” step is complete, your sour cream blocks won’t stick together when you transfer them to an airtight container, which will help you save some freezer space.

When it comes to thawing, either leave the container or sour cream in the refrigerator overnight or add the frozen sour cream blocks in frozen.

Storage Period For Frozen Sour Cream

Your sour cream should last up to 6 months in the freezer.

Once you’ve thawed your sour cream, try to use it within a week.

What You Can Use Frozen/Thawed Sour Cream In

Here’s the downside of sour cream: because of its high water content, its texture will become grainy and separated. That means sour cream that has been frozen and then thawed isn’t nice when eaten on its own.

Instead, you can use thawed sour cream – or frozen sour cream blocks – in these recipes:

  • pancakes
  • muffins
  • casseroles
  • soups
  • stews
  • pies

Where Else Can I Store My Sour Cream?

Of course, freezing your sour cream isn’t your only option. The alternative is to store your sour cream in the refrigerator.

If you choose this method, store your sour cream in the refrigerator before you’ve opened it, and after.

Once you’ve opened your sour cream, make sure you only use clean utensils and don’t double dip. Either reseal the packaging if that’s possible, or transfer it to an airtight container, which will act as a barrier against your sour cream and the bacteria and moisture of the outside world.

Unopened sour cream will last for about 1-3 weeks until its use-by date, according to the USDA. However, if you store your sour cream in the refrigerator as soon as you’re home from the grocery store, don’t be surprised if your unopened tub lasts a whole 1-2 weeks after that date.

Once you’ve opened your sour cream, finish it within 2 weeks.

The Sour Cream Summary

Now you know if freezing your sour cream is the right option, plus how to freeze sour cream if you want to. Here’s the recap if you need it:

  • Your sour cream will last 1-3 weeks in the refrigerator, and its storage life doesn’t change much once it has been opened. Therefore, if you’re planning to eat your sour cream soon, freezing might not be necessary.
  • Freezing your sour cream will keep it good for up to 6 months.
  • The downside of freezing sour cream is that its texture will change, so you should only use it when mixed in other recipes.
  • The easiest method of freezing sour cream is popping the unopened tub in the freezer. That’s it!

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Alisa Shimoyama

Alisa eats her way around the world on her travels and likes to have good food ready and waiting for her when she gets back.